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Visiting Marche? 5 things to absolutely see in Fermo

Visiting Marche? 5 things to absolutely see in Fermo

Are you planning a few-hour visit, but you have no idea what are the 5 things to absolutely see in Fermo?

Follow me in these few lines because I’ll let you know.

If you are in town for work, study or pleasure and have little time to visit the city, here is a list of the 5 things to absolutely see in Fermo.

  1. PIAZZA DEL POPOLO

    The heart of the city, with its particular shape is a must. It offers a show of rare beauty and architectural rigor. Some of the most significant buildings of the city are located here; Palazzo dei Priori, Palazzo degli Studi and Archbishop’s Palace. Its first configuration dates back to 1442; it was completed  in 1528 with the Loggiato di San Rocco. The Palazzo degli Studi houses the Civic Library. It contains 128 codes, more than 400,000 volumes and 18,000 books. This building is connected by a loggia to the Palazzo dei Priori; it houses the Civic Art Gallery and the Piceno archaeological section. It houses a statue of Pope Sixtus V. The Pinacoteca collects works from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century; “The Adoration of the Shepherds” of  Rubens is of considerable importance. In the Picena Archaeological Section it is possible to admire the remains of the pre-Roman Fermo.

 

  1. SALA DEL MAPPAMONDO

    Located inside the Palazzo dei Priori, built according to the wishes of the cardinal Decio Azzolini. It houses the books of his library and those of Paolo Ruffo. Entirely covered in wood spruce ceiling and ancient armchairs. The collection includes about 3,000 manuscripts, 127 codes and 300,000 volumes; it includes 681 incunabulums, more than 15,000 editions from the 16th century. There are 23,000 editions in collections, numerous specimens of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and musical prints. More than 800 historical magazines, 5,000 drawings and 6,500 different types of engravings, coins and relics. The most important symbol part of this so wonderful and evocative hall is the imposing Globe. It was designed by the Abbot Amanzio Moroncelli in 1713. The wooden structure of the globe is the work of Filippantonio Morrone. The external covering is in real Fabriano paper.

 

  1. TEATRO DELL’AQUILA

    A few steps from the square you can visit Teatro dell’Aquila; opened in 1790 and for over 200 years one of the main centres of cultural activity in the region. It presents 124 dais on five rows. Total capacity: 1000 spectators. The ceiling painting is a tempera painting by Luigi Cochetti, a student of Minardi; it illustrates the Olympian Numens with Jupiter, Juno, the three Graces and the six Dancing Night Hours, all together intent on listening to Apollo’s song. In the middle of the ceiling shines the enormous 56-arms chandelier; made in gilded iron and ebonu sheets ordered in Paris and at that time powered by carbide. Also noteworthy is the curtain, a work of the painter Cochetti, depicting Armonia delivering the cithara to the fermano genius. The stage of around 350 square meters and the perfect acoustics make it one of the most prestigious historic theatres in Italy

 

  1. IL GIRFALCO

    Continuing along the hill where the theater is located, you can reach the highest point of the city of Fermo, Il Girfalco, located on the top of the Sabulo hill. From here, breathtaking  views open from different sides stretching from Monte Conero to the Adriatic Sea. During very clear days it is possible to see the Croatian coasts. Inside the park there are various monuments and places of interest such as the white Cathedral dedicated to Santa Maria Assunta, the fountain built in the early twentieth century to celebrate the aqueduct and Villa Vinci, now private property with a huge garden, but which for two centuries it hosted the Capuchin Convent. The great protagonist of this park is still the Nature: pine trees, cedars of Lebanon and holm oaks are just some of the specimens, in some cases even rare, which can be admired walking freely

 

  1. ROMAN CISTERNS

    Returning to the square, a few steps away there is Via degli Aceti, with its characteristic brick pavement with solemn buildings. Here you have the late medieval entrance of the Great Roman Cisterns, considered a heritage of the Roman architecture and hydraulic engineering. They were certainly realized as a response to a water requirement that otherwise could not have been satisfied. The interior consists of thirty rooms divided into three rows, each of which has a masonry covered with cocciopesto (opus signinum) which, as the creator Vitruvio writes, was used for the manufacture of thermal pools, aqueducts and, of course, cisterns.

 

Leaving the Cisterns, while you walk through the alleys to leave this city, a sense of melancholy will envelop you. You will not want to leave to be able to discover other fascinating aspects of this city and its territory. In this case you will be welcome guests. In fact, scattered throughout the municipal territory and its surroundings is full of B & Bs, farm holidays, vacation homes, apartments to spend moments of relaxation and tranquility. If, on the other hand, you really have to leave, don’t worry, the city of Fermo will be waiting to welcome you again and show you all its beauty.

 

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Marc Partiti

Experienced Property and Revenue Manager, with strong background in Business Administration. Born in the UK, I spent over 20 years in Italy. In 2007 I moved to Thailand where I’m currently living.

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